MODERN VICTORIAN DECORATING : MODERN VICTORIAN


Modern victorian decorating : How to decorate cupcakes for kids.



Modern Victorian Decorating





modern victorian decorating






    decorating
  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"

  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"





    victorian
  • of or relating to Queen Victoria of Great Britain or to the age in which she ruled; "Victorian morals"

  • priggish: exaggeratedly proper; "my straitlaced Aunt Anna doesn't approve of my miniskirts"

  • a person who lived during the reign of Victoria

  • A person who lived during the Victorian period





    modern
  • a contemporary person

  • belonging to the modern era; since the Middle Ages; "modern art"; "modern furniture"; "modern history"; "totem poles are modern rather than prehistoric"

  • a typeface (based on an 18th century design by Gianbattista Bodoni) distinguished by regular shape and hairline serifs and heavy downstrokes

  • A person who advocates or practices a departure from traditional styles or values











Oxford University Museum of Natural History




Oxford University Museum of Natural History





Oxford University Museum of Natural History and Pitt Rivers Museum
In the 1840's science was at a low ebb within the university. Thomas Acland the guiding light behind the building was determined to redress this deficiency within the great university. It was Acland a personal friend of John Ruskin that was primarily responsible for igniting Ruskin's enthusiasm for the project, which eventually reflected as much upon Ruskinian principals as it did upon Acland's initial vision.
The Museum next to University Parks and preceding Keble College (now opposite)1860 by Deane and Wooward fortuitously coincided with Charles Darwin's "Origin of Species". The building is remarkable as it records this period faithfully but reflects John Ruskin's influence upon the upon architecture and a meeting of artistic and scientific ideas in this seminal period. The museum also hosted the celebrated meeting of The British Association at which Thomas Henry Huxley defended Darwin's theory of evolution by means of natural selection against Rt Revd. Samuel Wilberforce the then Bishop of Oxford.The building was built in a gothic style however its construction was in modern materials and was forward looking, although perhaps its iron and glass interior owes something to Paxton's Crystal Palace, though certainly not in its style which has been described as a Belgian wool hall rather than a Venetian Palace as favoured by Ruskin. The building does however reflect in a physical and artistic form the ideas and principles that shaped Ruskin's thought and life and is in stark contrast to almost any other secular building of the period,

The building both inside and out is covered in some of the finest stone-carving of the Victorian era to be found anywhere in Britain. Much of this was done under Ruskin's direction, see James O'Shea's work (window west front). Ruskin believed that much of the design and ornament should be left to the workers themselves once the main architectural principles had ben established. This was the first building where the O'Shea brothers of Ballhooly, Co Cork were employed.

This building's interior is like a forest of iron and glass, the spandrels are richly decorated and the capitals comprise of elaborate foliage. These were wrought by Francis Skidmore of Coventry.

SeeThe architects Journal 27 Sept 1989 in the seres "Masters of Building"












Oxford University Museum of Natural History




Oxford University Museum of Natural History





Stonework by O'Shea brothers, under John Ruskin's direction.
In the 1840's science was at a low ebb within the university. Thomas Acland the guiding light behind the building was determined to redress this deficiency within the great university. It was Acland a personal friend of John Ruskin that was primarily responsible for igniting Ruskin's enthusiasm for the project, which eventually reflected as much upon Ruskinian principals as it did upon Acland's initial vision.
The Museum next to University Parks and preceding Keble College (now opposite)1860 by Deane and Wooward fortuitously coincided with Charles Darwin's "Origin of Species". The building is remarkable as it records this period faithfully but reflects John Ruskin's influence upon the upon architecture and a meeting of artistic and scientific ideas in this seminal period. The museum also hosted the celebrated meeting of The British Association at which Thomas Henry Huxley defended Darwin's theory of evolution by means of natural selection against Rt Revd. Samuel Wilberforce the then Bishop of Oxford.The building was built in a gothic style however its construction was in modern materials and was forward looking, although perhaps its iron and glass interior owes something to Paxton's Crystal Palace, though certainly not in its style which has been described as a Belgian wool hall rather than a Venetian Palace as favoured by Ruskin. The building does however reflect in a physical and artistic form the ideas and principles that shaped Ruskin's thought and life and is in stark contrast to almost any other secular building of the period,

The building both inside and out is covered in some of the finest stone-carving of the Victorian era to be found anywhere in Britain. Much of this was done under Ruskin's direction, see James O'Shea's work (window west front). Ruskin believed that much of the design and ornament should be left to the workers themselves once the main architectural principles had ben established. This was the first building where the O'Shea brothers of Ballhooly, Co Cork were employed.

This building's interior is like a forest of iron and glass, the spandrels are richly decorated and the capitals comprise of elaborate foliage. These were wrought by Francis Skidmore of Coventry.

SeeThe architects Journal 27 Sept 1989 in the seres "Masters of Building"










modern victorian decorating







Similar posts:

decorative garden sprinkler

celestial wall decor

blue room decor

cabin decoration

decorating high walls

decorating kids play room

decorated taper candles

deer kitchen decor

centerpiece decoration ideas

purple decor



tag : modern victorian decorating wholesale decorative vases car nursery decor living

: Category: None : Comments : 0 : Trackbacks : 0
Pagetop
Post a comment
Private comment

Pagetop
« next  HOME  prev »

Profile

corporate office decor

Author:corporate office decor
Welcome to FC2!

Latest comments

Latest trackbacks

Monthly archive

Search form